Talk:A Decemberween Pageant

From Homestar Runner Wiki

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(Dorothy?)
Line 7: Line 7:
Because it's not true - the term "[[Wikipedia:Deus ex machina|Deus ex machina]]" dates back to Greek plays and has nothing to do with anyone being carried out of the scene by a rope - even if that happens, that's not a Deus ex machina in and of itself. Just a heads up. --[[User:Jay|Jay]] 21:11, 15 Apr 2005 (UTC)
Because it's not true - the term "[[Wikipedia:Deus ex machina|Deus ex machina]]" dates back to Greek plays and has nothing to do with anyone being carried out of the scene by a rope - even if that happens, that's not a Deus ex machina in and of itself. Just a heads up. --[[User:Jay|Jay]] 21:11, 15 Apr 2005 (UTC)
 +
 +
No, [[Wikipedia:Deus ex machina|Deus ex machina]] refers to both the concept of a sudden change at the end and the machince which would lower a god-character onto the stage in Greek theater. I'm not sure that Homestar flying off the stage is a reference to that though. [[User:Dripping yellow madness|Dripping yellow madness]] 22:27, 23 December 2005 (UTC)
== Plays ==
== Plays ==

Revision as of 22:27, 23 December 2005

Deux ex wrongina

Okay, I accidently hit "Enter" while trying to hit "Backspace" in the Summary line. I removed this fact:

The scene wherein Homestar is flown half-way out could well reference the style of the old religious plays. The God-figure was often flown in or out of the scene by way of a winch and sturdy rope, both of which were generally visible to the audience anyway. This sudden appearance, used as a means of reaching the end or moral of the play, is one of the accepted roots of the term "Deus ex machina," which in this case is taken literally.

Because it's not true - the term "Deus ex machina" dates back to Greek plays and has nothing to do with anyone being carried out of the scene by a rope - even if that happens, that's not a Deus ex machina in and of itself. Just a heads up. --Jay 21:11, 15 Apr 2005 (UTC)


No, Deus ex machina refers to both the concept of a sudden change at the end and the machince which would lower a god-character onto the stage in Greek theater. I'm not sure that Homestar flying off the stage is a reference to that though. Dripping yellow madness 22:27, 23 December 2005 (UTC)

Plays

Who thinks that plays should have their own individual category? You could put in this one, Dreamaway Johnny, and Sbemail. And maybe Dangeresque: Put 'em On Ice, too. If this is a terrible idea, do tell. If it's a not totally bad idea, do tell. --VolatileChemical 03:56, 1 May 2005 (UTC)

Dorothy?

I'm watching The Wizard of Oz right now, and I'm pretty sure that the Scarecrow tells the Tin Man not to cry, when they're in the poppies. I'll get back to y'all when I'm finished watchin' it all, though. The Benedicio is all up ons.---Robert Benedicio 01:29, 13 November 2005 (UTC)

Personal tools