HRWiki:STUFF/Archive/Teen Girl Squad Issue 9

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[edit] My Art Galleries

Cheerleader calling the girls "art galleries" when they're ghosts is a reference to Luigi's Mansion.

From: Teen Girl Squad Issue 9
Posted on: 23:03, 26 Aug 2005 (UTC)

Arguments for:

  • It's the only reason Cheerleader would EVER call them that as ghosts, and Strong Bad seems to like playing video games.
  • This seems to be the only thing it would be a reference to.

Arguments against:

  • Too much of a stretch for a postitive reference.
  • There's no other dialogue or evidence to support the speculation.
  • It doesn't have to be a reference to anything it all...
  • It's one of the many play offs of "my girls" or "my gals" that Cheerleader does. Nothing special.

Additional comments:

  • Do you have something more concrete than "it's the only reason"? Perhaps a little background on the game?
    • Okay. In the game, Luigi's won a mansion in a contest he didn't enter. He meets Prof. E. Gadd and discovers Mario's been kidnapped. Long story short, after you beat the boss ghost, all the ones you've captured in that part are turned in to paintings for Gadd's art gallery.
  • This very well may be true, but there's just enough doubt that I can't support this with the wording "...is a reference". And I think it would be severly crippled if the wording were changed to "...may be a reference", such that it would not be worth noting at that point.
    • Can't support it? Then tell us what else it could be a reference to, could you?
      • The burden isn't on me to say why this item shouldn't be considered a reference; the burden is on those in favor of it to say why it should. Like I said above, you might be right about this one, but I'm not convinced. Maybe if the girls looked like paintings or something, but they don't.
      • This need not be a reference to anything other than the similar "gal" sound in galleries and gals.
  • At the beginning, Cheerleader calls them "Spanish galleons." She seems to enjoy giving them strange, unexplained nicknames, and therefore it may not be a reference at all.
  • In other TGSs, she calls them "gals" or "girls". Gallery, as well as galleones, are words with the "gal" sound. They are making fun of themselves.


Votes to accept: Votes to decline:
  1. Technochocolate
  2. Homsar999Talk
  1. It's dot com
  2. Rogue Leader / (my talk)
  3. Eldiran
  4. Elcool (talk)(contribs)
  5. Jay o'Lantern (Haunt)
  6. BazookaJoe
  7. aaronak
  8. phlip TC
  9. The Chort
  10. THE SMOKING MONKEY
  11. Trey56
  12. Xeroc
  13. ISlayedTheKerrek
  14. Ju Ju Master
  15. tomstiff
  16. Trey56
  17. Heimstern Läufer

[ Back to STUFF index ]

[edit] Math Geek

The only legible marks in Tomkins's Algebra paper are the number 3 and what appears to be a square root sign. If you zoom in, you can see that the original problem appears to be 3 times the -1st root of (4L^-1) divided by an unintelligible scribble. This can be simplified to 3L / (4 x unintelligible). His answer appears to be some random doodle; it could be anything.

From: Teen Girl Squad Issue 9
Posted on: 00:18, 3 Jul 2005 (UTC)

Arguments for:

  • For some it's interesting.
  • The fact that someone took the time to work through a non-sensical throw-away gag is a true labor of love...leave it.


Arguments against:

  • For some it makes no sense.
  • As written, this rambles and makes little sense.
  • It's a Teen Girl Squad cartoon, where the sun can turn into a giant buzzsaw for no reason at all. It doesn't matter that a math question makes no sense.
  • Click on the image above for a larger view. It doesn't really look like a 4. And the first -1 can hardly be called that. The L could be a scribble. The square root symbol might be a long division symbol (Tompkins did say pre-algebra). The only thing we can be sure of is the 3. In short, this whole thing is unintelligible.


Additional comments:

  • If it's interesting for some, leave it.
  • Essentially, this says that a scribbly unintelligible math problem has a scribbly unintelligible answer. Is this honestly interesting to anyone?
  • If we are to transctibe every written thing on the site (Such as the actual SBemails), this writing should be noted in the Easter Egg's transcript, not in the fun Facts saction.
  • Even if it's not put in the transcript, remove the "simplification."
  • To above ArgFor: The amount of time put into a fact is not a factor in whether or not a fact should be used. The "simplification" is extremely unnecessary and irrelevant.
  • The zoomed-in picture makes clear what wasn't so before: this fact is factually inaccurate.


Votes to accept: Votes to decline:
  1. Ppk01
  2. VolatileChemical
  3. Homsar999ß
  4. Ju Ju Master
  5. Thesmokingmonkey
  6. daunrealist
  7. mibluvr13dígame
  8. SBEmail22
  9. Homeschool Runner
  10. Tristeza
  11. Upset_Your_Balance
  1. tomstiff
  2. It's dot com
  3. Polly
  4. small_logo.pngUsername-talk
  5. BazookaJoe
  6. Homestar Coderhomestar-coder-sig.gif
  7. aaronak
  8. GG Crono
  9. Rogue Leader / (my talk)
  10. Jay o'Lantern (Haunt)
  11. Darklinkskywalker|Talk_|i did this stuff_
  12. phlip TC

Proposed revision:

(There will be no Fun Fact, but the scribblings would be noted in the Easter Egg's transcript like so: TOMPKINS: {holding a piece of paper with mathematical symbols on it, graded "A+++++" and 3 times the -1st root of (4L^-1) divided by an unintelligible scribble.)

Arguments for:

  • It sould be noted somewhere.

Arguments against:

  • It's already noted in the transcript. If someone wants to see the symbols, they can watch the toon!
  • The accuracy of the description is disputed. See the image next to the last Argument Against above.

Additional comments:


Votes to accept: Votes to decline:
  1. Elcool (talk)(contribs)
  1. tomstiff
  2. It's dot com
  3. Homestar Coderhomestar-coder-sig.gif
  4. — User:ACupOfCoffee@

[ Back to STUFF index ]

[edit] Hangin' out next to the Old Person

Apparently, the girls are standing next to Mr. Pitters in nearly every episode, you just never see him because he is hidden behind the frame. This is similar to the "Strong Sad, how long have you been standing there?" joke in The Luau, and Homestar's claim that he is in every SB Email but is hidden behind the black in flashback.

From: Teen Girl Squad Issue 9
Posted on: 03:18, 2 Jul 2005 (UTC)

Arguments for:

Arguments against:

  • There is nothing to indicate that the TGS hangs out next to Mr. Pitters in "nearly every episode." Maybe he just started hanging around them some time between episodes 8 and 9.
  • Even then, the usage of similar jokes does not need to be noted if one isn't a reference to the other.
  • Probably, Mr. Pitters randomly appeared at the whim of Strong Bad. If you try to rationalize things from TGS, you get a headache.

Additional comments:

  • It may mean the girls just hang out with him during summer vacation, and the only summer TGS was a spring break one, so he wouldn't be there.


Votes to accept: Votes to decline:
  1. Norman rorqual
  1. Jay o'Lantern (Haunt)
  2. tomstiff
  3. Homestar Coderhomestar-coder-sig.gif
  4. sninky-chan
  5. Polly
  6. small_logo.pngUsername-talk
  7. Styles Upon Styles
  8. BazookaJoe
  9. aaronak
  10. Thesmokingmonkey
  11. Elcool (talk)(contribs)

[ Back to STUFF index ]

[edit] Babbage's

Strong Bad is unaware that Babbage's stores do not tend to stock obsolete game consoles such as TurboGrafx 16. They generally do not inventory anything prior to PlayStation.

From: Teen Girl Squad Issue 9
Posted on: 09:54, 23 Jun 2005 (UTC)

Arguments for:

  • Seems valid. The Fun Facts in Real-World References do NOT point out how obscure the consoles are or what Babbage's/GameStops stock in the slightest.

Arguments against:

  • The age and obsolescence of the TG16 is described sufficiently by the other Real-World Reference listed:
    • The TurboGrafx 16 was a video game console released by NEC in 1989, for the North American market.
  • It would therefore be an obvious absurdity for a modern-day store to carry TurboGrafx 16.
  • Part of what makes this gag so funny is the fact that no store in its right mind (except a retro gaming store) would carry games for such an unpopular system that flopped to start with. It doesn't need to be stated that the TurboGrafix 16 is hard to find. Anyone who knows what it is gets the joke and anyone who's never heard of the system still laughs because it's obvious that Strong Bad is looking for something obscure. (And if they need more info, they can read the Wikipedia article.)

Additional comments:

  • Incidentally, when the fact was being written, it was intended to pertain to more than just the TurboGrafx-16.
  • Isn't it possible that the entire episode is happening back in the late 80s? Plenty of H*R happens in the past - I would argue that the reference to the Turbografx 16 is to hint at a timeframe. I actually have memories of the TG16 system in Babbage's. The fact that few Babbage's exist today just furthers the argument that this episode takes place in the late 80s/early 90s.
    • No, Strong Bad just has no clue about the new systems. Remember, he thinks Rhino Feeder is next gen.
      • And while his computers are definitely ancient, Strong Sad ridicules him and The Cheat has an iMac.
  • I know someone who bought boxed Odyssey II (a system contemporary with the Atari 2600/Intellivision) games in a Best Buy store near Indianapolis in 2004. And Babbage's/GameStop bought and sold older games (including the TG-16 and other forgotten platforms) until 2003. Strong Bad may not know of the company's change in policy.


Votes to accept: Votes to decline:
  1. Shadow Hog
  2. Clichemoth
  1. phlip TC
  2. Eytanz
  3. tomstiff
  4. — InterruptorJones
  5. It's dot com
  6. TheGilmanator
  7. No Smorking
  8. Tony Stony Talk | Edits
  9. sninky-chan
  10. small_logo.pngUsername-talk

[ Back to STUFF index ]

[edit] Well, Duh, She's a Teen

Generally speaking, American teenagers get a driver's license at about sixteen years of age. Given the fact that she's had a driver's license for a year, it appears that What's Her Face is at least seventeen years old.

From: Teen Girl Squad Issue 9
Posted on: 20:57, 20 Jun 2005 (UTC)

Arguments for:

  • The girls of Teen Girl Squad have been presented as 8th graders (i.e. 13 or 14 years old) almost since the outset. To discover that What's Her Face is possibly 3 or 4 or 5 years *older* than the others is interesting and notable.
  • Strong Bad only calls them between the ages of 13 and 19 as a stupid dumb fact. It's good to know that since they're all from the same place with the same laws, she's definitely a considerable age older than them, since they are bragging about somebody with their permit and she has her license. Plus, it shows that they don't even really care about her.

Arguments against:

  • Past HR wiki posting have consistently showed that, <<<said in a Johnny Cohcraine voice<<< if anything is doubt, it's left out. <<<end voice<<< The same with the SB car reference and the heaven reference. Consistency says that speculation gets deleted.
  • The title of the program is Teen Girl Squad. This pretty much rules out twenty and leaves very little variation between 13-19.
  • Can anyone say, "Where is Springfield?" Pointless discussion. Knowing that the age of the TGS characters falls under "teen" is enough information for most people.
  • In Teen Girl Squad Issue 3, Strong Bad in the closing song states,"Teen Girl Squad! They're-teenage-girls-between-the-ages-of-thirteen-and-nineteen!" It's a given.
  • Given that each state has vastly different driving laws, we don't know what her age is. We don't know if she has ever been left back. Some heavily agricultural states allow farming licences at 14 so this fact is useless.
  • The state with the lowest age at which you can get your regular driver's license is South Dakota, age 14y, 3m (Official South Dakota thing), so assuming they are around the same age (as shown in Teen Girl Squad Issue 7), they are all between 15 and 19.
    • I believe Wyoming also has an age limit of only 14 before you can earn your license.
  • There is nothing to suggest with WHF's design that she is older. She looks the same age as the other girls.
  • It's a fictional (random) comic, that doesn't really make any sense, so their age and the country they live in doesn't matter. It might not even be set in Free Country, let alone the U.S.A.
  • WHF is the same age as the other girls in Teeny Tiny Girl Squad. Which means that if she's 17, so are the other girls.

Additional comments:

  • It's a given that they're between 13 and 19, but the fact states that WHF is at least 17.
  • The fact that WHF is hanging out with girls significantly younger than her may contribute to her "loser" factor.
  • A proper revision to the fact would state that "Depending on which state TGS is set in, WHF could be at least 15 years old and could possibly be as old as 17."
  • It can be pointed out that Cheerleader refers to Crazy Learner's Permit Girl as an "olda girl." Assuming she (and Cheerleader, So and So, and The Ugly One) didn't just fail to get their permits ASAP, this automatically makes What's Her Face older than the "olda girl", and thus, older than all of the rest of TGS.
  • WHF could still be in 8th grade because she could have been held back.
    • In episode 5, So-and-so says that they're in 8th grade. That was on "Spring-type Break", however, and a year could have easily passed between issue 5 and issue 9.
    • That doesn't change the fact that they were the same age in episode 7.
    • However, many preschool and kindergarten classes contain students with age differences of up to 1-3 years.
      • Actually the ages usually differ by months, not years. This fact reeks of "You said Doyng again". You just can't prove WHF's actual age. Especially considering that this is a comic where characters die and then come back to life the next episode. There is no basis is reality.


Votes to accept: Votes to decline:
  1. tomstiff
  2. Jay o'Lantern (Haunt)
  3. It's dot com
  4. single deuce
  5. Ju Ju Master
  6. Rogue leader
  7. Kiwi
  8. DAunrealist
  9. Sparky221
  10. GG Crono
  11. Kvb
  12. SA2Tails
  13. Some HSR themed username
  14. TheSneak
  15. VolatileChemical
  16. Svelt
  17. SBEmail22
  18. Crystallina
  19. James Craven
  20. super orange!
  21. Tony Stony Talk | Edits
  22. Norman rorqual
  23. Ganome
  24. Styles Upon Styles
  1. Nucleartonga
  2. «Rob»
  3. shlammy
  4. TROGGA!
  5. Invisible Robot Fish
  6. Donny vs Universe
  7. EMJS
  8. adavidw
  9. phlip TC
  10. sninky-chan

[ Back to STUFF index ]

[edit] Like I don't get two jillion of these facts every two jillion seconds

Strong Bad needing a ride to Babbages is an oblique reference to car, where he admitted he doesn't have a car.

From: Teen Girl Squad Issue 9
Posted on: 06:16, 21 Jun 2005 (UTC)

Arguments for:

  • Him getting a ride may really be because he doesn't have a car, which is a reference to car.
  • We have never seen the Gremlin actually driving, at least not without fancy camera-work and a helpful The Cheat grip.

Arguments against:

  • It's never said that Strong Bad needed a ride, just that he was given one.
  • This is a comic, none of it is canon as far as the "real" Homestar Runner world is concerned.
  • Strong Bad is known to have access to a car, as seen in Dangeresque 3.

Additional comments:

  • Perhaps a rewording: "Strong Bad getting a ride to Babbages may be a reference to car, where he admitted he doesn't have a car."
    • "May be" facts are not facts. You can't make something into a reference by making the wording more vague.


Votes to accept: Votes to decline:
  1. DAunrealist
  1. Ppk01
  2. SA2Tails
  3. tomstiff
  4. Mithent
  5. Ju Ju Master
  6. Some HSR themed username
  7. TheSneak
  8. BazookaJoe
  9. single deuce
  10. Eytanz
  11. Nucleartonga
  12. Tony Stony Talk | Edits
  13. Norman rorqual
  14. Styles Upon Styles

[ Back to STUFF index ]

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